Belly dance is an expressive dance which emphasizes complex movements of the torso. Originally a Middle Eastern folk dance, it has evolved to take many different forms depending on the country and region, both in costume and dance style. New styles have evolved in the West as its popularity has spread globally. In Arabic, the dance is known as Raqs Sharqi (“Eastern Dance”) or Raqs Beledi(“Country Dance” or “Folk Dance”).


Flappers were a generation of young Western women in the 1920s who wore short skirts, bobbed their hair, listened to jazz, and flaunted their disdain for what was then considered acceptable behavior. Flappers were seen as brash for wearing excessive makeup, drinking, treating sex in a casual manner, smoking, driving automobiles, and otherwise flouting social and sexual norms.


Burlesque, the term, particularly in the United States, refers to performances in a variety show format. These were popular from the 1860s to the 1940s, often in cabarets and clubs, as well as theaters, and featured bawdy comedy and female striptease. Some Hollywood films attempted to recreate the spirit of these performances from the 1930s to the 1960s, or included burlesque-style scenes within dramatic films, such as 1972’s Cabaret and 1979’s All That Jazz, among others. There has been a resurgence of interest in this format since the 1990s.

Belly Dancer

Belly Dancer

Dancers

Our belly dancer is a lifelong dancer and professional belly dancer, currently based out of New Orleans, La. She has spent the last half of her life submerged in the studies and performance of its variations such as Classical Arabic/Egyptian Cabaret, American Vintage Belly Dance, and Eastern European folkloric.  PROFILE

Pin It on Pinterest